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Oceanography Student Home Page
for all oceanography students, click above or scroll down, read first

Introduction
About Me
Course Syllabus
Getting Started
The Daily Dope
Calendar of Everything
Subscribable Mailing Lists
Study Hall
Ocean View Lounge
Section Home Pages
Learn to Read Very Carefully
E-Mail Me


sean2_sm.jpg (3778 bytes)    Yo. Whaddup. Ready for some kick-ass dope on the liquid dome of our planet? Read on...

William Sean Chamberlin, Ph.D., your instructor

Introduction

Greetings! You have reached the home page for oceanography students enrolled in internet, lecture and laboratory sections taught by Sean Chamberlin.

You may be wondering why I've brought all of you together on one page. The answer is simple: learning is a life-long process and we are engaged in learning something about the ocean. Having an awareness of what's going on in other sections expands your recognition of the oceanography that is going on around you all the time, not just in this course, but in your daily life as well. All of us are embarked on a journey called life and we can all help each other out. The better we get to know each other, the more rewarding and exciting our journey will be.

There is one other purpose for bringing everyone here: all students in my courses are required to use the Internet to submit materials required for the course. Does that mean on-campus lecture students need to have access to the Internet? Yes. Does that mean lab students need to have access to the Internet? Yes. Does that mean Internet-based lecture students need to....? You get the idea.

What if you don't have access to the Internet? You have three choices: 1) you can purchase a $10 computer lab card at Fullerton College for access to a computer and the Internet for the entire semester; 2) you can set up your home computer for Internet access; 3) you can take another section of this course offered by instructors who don't require Internet access (harsh! >:-{)

Why do I insist that students learn how to navigate the Internet? I believe that learning how to use a computer and familiarizing yourself with the tools to access the Internet and the World Wide Web are the most valuable skills you can learn in college right now. I don't care if you are training to become a beautician, an auto mechanic, a sky diver or a pearl diver, you will need to know how to use a computer and you will need to know how to find and exchange information on the Internet. Businesses cite a lack of technology skills as one of the major limitations of new employees. As Yoda says, you will learn...you will!

Some of you will resist. But if you give it a chance, if you are willing to learn, even if you have never sat in front of a computer, I will make sure you gain the skills you need. I take it as a personal mission to train all of my students how to use the Internet. I can't teach you everything about using a computer, that's not the purpose of this course. What I can do, however, is open a world of opportunity for you and show you the vast ocean of resources that are available through the Internet. It's part of that life-long learning thing. And there is no better place to start than in an oceanography class.

The following sections provide an overview of the important sections and features on this web site. It is designed to give you an overall warm and fuzzy feeling for the course. The important sections described below are covered in greater detail as you proceed through the syllabus. For now, just familiarize yourself with these summaries and then continue your reading of the syllabus.

About Me

You will find a biography of sorts posted on a page called About Sean Chamberlin. This is the edited version of my life, the sort of stuff you'd tell your mom if you brought me home for the weekend. For an unedited, unabashed, honest and perhaps lurid version of my life, send me an e-mail and I'll gladly point you to my personal web page.

Course Syllabus

The Course Syllabus is the nerve center of our course this semester. It is arranged into fifteen (15) sections. Each section contains hyperlinks that take you to all of the required reading for the course. Not all of the hyperlinks will be immediately available at the beginning of the semester. Those are pages that I am updating and I will turn them on when you need them. You will be tested on your understanding of this material. At the end of each section you will find a hyperlink to practice quizzes designed to help you learn the material. You will also find a hyperlink to the exam for each section. You will learn more about grading and the exams in the Course Guidelines. The most important thing to remember is that the syllabus is your guide to the required reading for the course.

Getting Started

Everybody should read this section a couple times. First, it is part of the required reading on the Course Syllabus. Second, it's got lots of important information. Getting Started provides *invaluable suggestions* for managing the online aspects of this course. All students, internet-, lecture- and lab-based, will be responsible for submitting materials online. This section will help you figure out how to do that. Here you will learn proper procedures for submitting e-mails, quizzes, exams, assignments and other forms of correspondence. This section also features a sort of online tour of the web site. It is especially designed to help familiarize you with using a web browser (that's the program you are using to read this page) and help you learn how to send and receive e-mail.

The Daily Dope

Everybody should read the Daily Dope every day. Serious.. It doesn't matter whether you are in an internet, lecture or lab section, you should read it. Not all of the announcements will pertain to you, but that's okay. It's about awareness, baby, awareness. Even if the page isn't updated, it can't hurt to read it again. This page provides reminders of important due dates, notification of e-mails sent to you, elaboration of details on study materials, explanations of frequently asked questions, requests for student information, alerts for upcoming field trips, and encouragement, scolding, advice and funny stuff to keep you engaged in learning. Oftentimes, when you send me an e-mail asking a question, chances are you will find the answer on this page. In fact, I will often refer you to this page to answer your question. So make it a daily habit with your morning coffee, tea, juice or chalice offering.

Calendar of Everything

At the risk of confusing the h#@! out of everybody, I post the Calendar of Everything. This calendar contains important milestones (aka due dates) for everybody in all sections of the course. Pay very close attention to your due dates and ignore the other due dates. If you are not enrolled in a lab and/or if internet and lecture sections have different due dates, don't worry about it. The calendar provides a convenient way for all students to keep track of their progress in the course. It also lets you know what's happening in other sections, in case you'd like to drop in for a visit. This is especially true for students who wish to participate in a certain field class or field expedition, even though they aren't enrolled in that section. Any student is welcome to attend any of my classes at any time. Just let me know ahead of time. Guests are usually welcome if space is available, if they don't bite and as long as they don't scream during the outing.

Subscribable Mailing Lists

A subscribable mailing list works like this: you submit a blank e-mail to a specified e-mail address and it enters your return address onto a mailing list. Whenever I or another student post a message to the mailing list, that message gets sent to everyone who has subscribed. Not only is it a lot of fun, but it is a very useful way to discuss, disseminate and explain important information. I may even kick down a few answers to exam questions to subscribers. So check out the Subscribable Mailing List page and watch your e-mail grow. It doesn't cost anything. It doesn't enter your name on anybody else's mailing list. It won't make you vulnerable to credit card fraud or FBI wiretaps. It's perfectly harmless and enormously helpful. I subscribe to several of the hundreds of thousands of lists available on the Internet.

Study Hall

This ain't no party, this ain't no disco, but it's the next best thing. The existence of the Study Hall precludes any excuse for not doing well in the course. The study hall consists of forums (fancy electronic bulletin boards) for forming study groups, discussing course materials and getting help with projects. It gives you a place to go to interact with other students and exchange notes. Participation is the key. Take an active part in the study hall and your grades will improve.

Ocean View Lounge

Now this is the place to kick back after a hard day of studying and just relax. In the Ocean View Lounge, you will find a chat room open 24 hours a day, a forum for meeting other students and links to live internet radio stations, streaming feature films, rave happenings and other recreational activities.

Section Home Pages

Each section of this course--Internet, Lecture and Lab--has a home page with links and descriptions specific to that section. Information specific to each section are included here.

Learn to Read Very Carefully

What amazes me more than anything about this world is people's seeming inability to read carefully. In a world of sound bites, it's easy to gloss over the details, but in a college course, not paying attention to the details can be killer. When I worked as a ticket seller for the Washington State Ferry System, I found that many people *tune out* their surroundings and miss important details (like what time the ferry leaves, which dock it leaves from), even if those details are staring them in the face. I'm not complaining, I'm just saying that's the way it is. In a course like this, the devil is in the details. Get in the habit of reading each word, even if you think you've read it before. When typing your e-mail address, get in the habit of reading each letter, or the consequences can be severe. It really is incumbent upon you to learn how to read very carefully. It will make your life and my life much much easier and it will make your ability to succeed in this course a lot easier.

E-Mail Me

I love teaching and I especially love teaching through the Internet. This is a very powerful medium with tremendous potential for teaching and learning. Despite what many think, the Internet offers much closer interactions between students and teachers. We can respond to each other through individual e-mails. We can chat and discuss topics 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We can review charts and graphs, play with interactive demonstrations, review bits of video and explore other worlds in a way that we could never do in the classroom. I hope you enjoy surfing these pages as much as I enjoyed creating them. As always, if you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please feel free to e-mail me, drc@oceansonline.com.

Surf long and prosper!

go back to course syllabus now...

 
The Remarkable Ocean World™
P.O. Box 814
Fullerton, California,
92836 USA
E-mail: drc@oceansonline.com
Last Updated: 09/23/99
© 1999 All rights reserved.
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