Biological Oceanography Subject Library

The late Carl Lorenzen, a titan in the field of biological oceanography, once told me that biological oceanography is a very difficult field to master. A biological oceanographer must be conversant with ocean physics and chemistry, must understand atmospheric and radiative processes, must know something about microbiology, biochemistry, physiology, zoology, and ecology; must be adept at mathematics and skilled in computer analysis of large data sets; in short, a biological oceanographer must be a master of all trades. For this reason, only the most brilliant minds succeed in biological oceanography. Despite this caveat, the material here is intended to give an appreciation for the fundamental processes that govern the flow of energy and materials in the oceans. Understanding the nature of the world around you will give you a keener sense of life, a bolder vision of the world, and a deeper feeling for the true wonder of it all.

Biological Oceanography The Gaia Hypothesis
Biological Oceanography Gaia Thoughts
Biological Oceanography Origins of life
Biological Oceanography Phytoplankton
Biological Oceanography Oceanic photosynthesis
Biological Oceanography The seasonal thermocline
Biological Oceanography Seasons of the sea
Biological Oceanography Oceanic food webs
Biological Oceanography Hydrothermal vent organisms
Biological Oceanography Creatures of the Abyss
Biological Oceanography Alvin and the ROVs
Biological Oceanography Squids
Biological Oceanography Fishes
Biological Oceanography Sharks
Biological Oceanography Whales and Dolphins
Biological Oceanography Songs of the Whale
Biological Oceanography Evolution of marine invertebrates
Biological Oceanography Dinosaurs of the sea
Biological Oceanography The California grunion
Biological Oceanography The Rocky Intertidal