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The Essential Remarkable Ocean World, Year 2001 Edition, 163 pages
W. Sean Chamberlin, PhD
$15 (includes book rate shipping)

A condensed version of the complete text. Intended for a sixteen week course of study in introductory oceanography.

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The Remarkable Ocean World Field Manual
by W. Sean Chamberlin, PhD. 2000
Coming 2003

A one-of-a-kind series of field exercises designed for oceanography students at all levels. Teaches students all aspects of a scientific investigation from hypothesis-making to oral presentation of results. Includes sensory techniques typically found in acting classes but adapted here for use in developing student's awareness of natural details. Extensive Internet resources are included as well.

The Remarkable Ocean World CD & Video Library
by W. Sean Chamberlin, PhD.
Coming 2003

The Remarkable Ocean World, Year 2002 Edition, 410 pages
Table of Contents

PREFACE FOR STUDENTS AND INSTRUCTORS
CHAPTER ONE: THE SCIENCE OF OCEANOGRAPHY
1.1 What is Oceanography?
1.1.1 The Ocean Defined
1.1.2 Oceanography and Kevin Bacon
1.1.3 Remarkable Ocean Facts
1.2 Challenges Facing Ocean Scientists
1.2.1 Who Pays for Ocean Research?
1.3 The Art of Scientific Thinking
1.3.1 What Makes a Good Scientific Question?
1.3.2 The Good Hypothesis
1.3.3 Definitions for the Scientific Method
1.3.4 A Beach Activity Called Twenty Questions
1.4 Maps and Tables and Graphs
1.4.1 How to Read a Map
1.4.2 How to Read a Table
1.4.3 Making Sense of Graphs
1.5 Simple Math
1.5.1 The Do-You-Need-to-Know-Math Questionnaire
1.5.2 Simple and Fun Oceanography Math Problems
CHAPTER 2. YOU, ME AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA
2.1 Tales of Ocean Exploration
2.1.1 A Common Thread
2.1.2 What's Hidden in a Midden?
2.1.3 California's First Oceanographers: The Chumash Indians
2.1.4 Pearl Divers of Mesopotamia
2.1.5 Tales of the South Pacific
2.1.6 Admiral Zheng's Fleet
2.1.7 The Vikings
2.1.8 The "Discovery" of California
2.1.9 Blackbeard the Pirate
2.1.10 The Voyages of Captain James Cook
2.1.11 Charles Darwin and the HMS Beagle
2.1.12 The Challenger Expedition
2.1.13 Benjamin Franklin and the Gulf Stream
2.1.14 Lieutenant Matthew Fontaine Maury, the "father" of oceanography
2.2 Art and Literature of the Sea
2.2.1 Pieces of Art and a Collection of Sea Paintings
2.2.2 A Few Watery Quotes
2.3 Environmental Issues
2.3.1 Overfishing
2.4 The Gaia Hypothesis
2.4.1 What is Gaia?
2.4.2 How Does Gaia Work?
2.4.3 Properties of living matter
2.4.4 What Does Gaia Predict?
2.4.5 Update Summer 1999
CHAPTER 3. ORIGINS OF THE OCEANS AND ITS LIFE
3.1 The Big Bang
3.1.1 Evidence for the Big Bang
3.1.2 Big Bang activity to try in your home
3.2 The Puzzling Problem of Galaxies
3.3 The Birth of Planet Earth
3.4 Formation of the Oceans
3.5 Continental Drift
3.5.1 The History of the Idea of Continental Drift
3.5.2 The Interior of the Earth
3.5.3 Earth's crust is broken into plates
3.5.4 Dance of the Continents
3.5.5 Plate Boundaries
3.5.6 Divergent Plate Boundaries
3.5.7 Convergent Boundaries
3.5 8 Transform Plate Boundaries
3.5.9 Rates of motion
3.5.10 Hot Spots and the Formation of the Hawaiian Islands
3.6 Where Submarines Lurk
3.6.1 The Major Ocean Basins and Their Features
3.6.2 Oceanic Ridges and Submarine Trenches
3.6.3 How Do We See the Bottom of the Sea?
3.7 Origins of Life in the Ocean
3.7.1 Evolution of Early Life: Precambrian Times (4.5 BYA to 540 MYA)
3.7.2 The Archaean Period (3.8 - 2.5 BYA): The First Signs of Life (3.8 BYA)
3.7.3 Appearance of photosynthetic organisms (3.5 BYA)
3.7.4 The Oxygen Holocaust (2.5 BYA) - The Proterozoic (2.5 BYA to 540 MYA)
3.7.5 Appearance of Eukaryotes (1.5 BYA)
3.8 Evolution of Invertebrates
3.8.1 Appearance of Multicellular Life (1 BYA)
3.8.2 An Explosion of Sea Life: The Paleozoic (540 to 250 MYA)
3.8.3 The Cambrian (540 - 500 MYA)
3.8.4 The Ordovician (500 - 440 MYA)
3.9 The Age of Fishes
3.10 Dinosaurs of the Sea
3.11 Evolution of Whales
3.12 Is Gaia Here?
CHAPTER 4: WATER, WATER, EVERYWHERE…
4.1 Properties of Water
4.2 The Paradox of Ice
4.3 The Hydrologic Cycle
4.4 Ten Ways to Conserve Water
4.5 Salty Tales from Hagar the Horrible
4.5.1 What is Salinity?
4.5.2 The Salt Mill in the Sea
4.6 Ocean Waters of the World
4.7 Ways to Measure Ocean Properties from a Ship
4.8 The Heard Island Experiment
4.9 Global Winds
4.9.1 The Air-Sea Interface
4.9.2 Which Way Do The Winds Blow?
4.10 The Major Ocean Currents
4.11 Ekman Spirals
4.12 Rings and Eddies
CHAPTER 5: SURF'S UP!
5.1 Ocean Waves
5.1.1 Anatomy of a Wave
5.1.2 Formation of Waves
5.1.3 Breaking Waves
5.2 Hit the Beach!
5.2 1 Anatomy of a Beach
5.2.2 The Longshore Current
5.2.3 Barrier Islands
5.3 Ride the Tides!
5.3.1 Tide-Causing Forces
5.3.2 Patterns in the Tides
5.3.3 Reading a Tide Chart
5.4 The California Grunion
5.5 Rocky and Periwinkle
5.5.1 Ecological Definitions
5.5.2 Intertidal Zonation
5.5.3 Physical Factors
5.5.4 Biological Factors
CHAPTER 6: LIGHT IN THE SEA
6.1 Electromagnetic Radiation
6.2 Why Earth Has Seasons
6.3 Light in the Sea
6.3.1 A Little Story About Light in the Sea
6.3.2 Calculations Using Beer's Law
CHAPTER 7: PHYTOPLANKTON ARE YOUR FRIENDS
7.1 Phytoplankton
7.1.1 Types of phytoplankton
7.1.2 How do they photosynthesize?
7.1.3 How do we measure photosynthesis in the ocean?
7.2 The Mean Green Carbohydrate Machine
7.2.1 What factors affect the growth of phytoplankton?
7.2.2 How productive are the oceans?
7.3 How do satellites improve our understanding of primary productivity?
7.4 A Brief Note on the Clines
7.5 Seasons of the Sea
7.5.1 Upwelling
7.5.2 The Seasonal Thermocline and Biological Productivity
7.5.3 The Big Picture
7.6 Ecological Succession in the Sea
CHAPTER 8: OCEANIC FOOD WEBS
8.1 The Structure of Marine Ecosystems
8.2 Trophic Levels and Ecological Efficiency
8.3 The Classical and Microbial Food Webs
8.4 The Fate of Primary Productivity
8.5 The Seasonal Food Web
8.6 Black Smokers and Giant Worms
8.6 1 The Discovery of Black Smokers
8.6.2 The Base of the Food Web: Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria
8.6.3 The Life and Death of Vent Organisms
8.7 Creatures of the Abyss
CHAPTER 9: SHARKS AND THEIR BUDDIES
9.1 Squid: The Ultimate in Invertebrate Styling
9.1.1 Squid Parts and Purposes
9.1.2 Squid Mating Rituals
9.2 Fishes
9.2.1 Three Kinds of Fishes
9.2.2 The Agnathans
9.2.3 The Chondrichthyes
9.2.4 The Osteichthyes
9.2.5 Adaptations of Marine Fishes
9.2.6 Buoyancy
9.2.7 Locomotion
9.2.8 Gas Exchange
9.2.9 Osmoregulation
9.2.10 Sensory Systems and Camouflage
9.2.11 Reproduction of Fishes
9.3 Sharks
9.3.1 Sharks and Shark Attacks
9.3.2 The Blue Shark
9.3.3 The Hammerhead
9.3.4 The Great White Shark
9.4 Whales
9.4.1 Feeding Strategies of Whales
9.4.2 Adaptations of Whales
9.4.3 Reproduction of Whales
9.5 Songs of the Whale
9.5.1 The Nature of Underwater Sound
9.5.2 Echolocation and Sonic Vision
9.5.3 Communication and Songs
9.5.4 How Intelligent Are Whales?
EPILOGUE: MY TRAVELS WITH JACQUES COUSTEAU

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