THIS IS A FICTITIOUS REPORT BY A FICTITIOUS GROUP. USE IT AS AN EXAMPLE FOR YOUR PRODUCT.

Group Name: Cybernauts Group

Members: Jack Hornet, Jill Hornet, Joe Effcee, Janet Stinger, Jerry Fullerton

News Reporter Summary: (Put your paragrah first) During the week of Septmeber 10-17, our group investigated the occurrence of large wave-generating storm systems and predicted their impact on beaches worldwide. Three hurricanes dominated the world ocean: two in the Pacific and one in the Atlantic. Satellite images revealed fetches in the 1000-2000 square kilometer range and storm tracks typical for storms in these oceans. Weather buoys in these locations registered wave periods from 17-22 seconds, with the longest periods related to Hurricane Lane in the Pacific Ocean. Wave models predicted two days of intense surf activity at southern California beaches for Monday and Tuesday. Surf cams at Huntington Beach registered 12-15 foot waves during that period. Similar occurrences were found at other locations in the Atlantic and Pacific. Our group found that satellite and weather buoy information were adequate for identifying storms, but not useful for determining the direction and size of waves. Wave forecast models increased our ability to predict waves but were not always correct. Surf cams gave the best picture of wave activity while it was happening, but offered no ability to track waves at night or to predict where waves would occur. More research will be necessary to accurately predict waves on a worldwide basis.

Space Scientist: (Put your paragraph(s) here) Three images collected from the GOES10 satellite illustrate the storm activity during the week of September 10-17: (Put image file names here) Hurricane_Lane.jpg; Hurricane_Donald.jpg and Hurricane Flo.jpg. (Describe the images and what they mean). Hurricane Lane occupied an area of 500 square kilometers with wind speeds up to 75 miles per hour. It traveled in a west-northwest direction. Winds from this hurricane are illustrated in an image found at Fleet Numerical, hurricane_winds.jpg. In this image, you can see the greatest winds centered at latitude and longitude. AND SO ON....

Weatherperson: (Put your paragraph(s) here) Wave buoys were not present in the path of Hurricane Flo, however, buoys near Hurricane Lane registered wave periods from 12-22 seconds over the course of three days, as shown in Table 1: Wave periods from buoy 42025 on Septmber 11, 12, 13. (Make Table 1 a separate text file and give me the file name here.) Surface wind speeds ranged from 30-80 miles per hour. Wave heights exceeded 20 feet for 6 hours; otherwise wave heights fell generally into the 8-10 feet range. A trend of increasing wave periods then decreasing wave periods corresponded to the westerly movement of the hurricane. As the hurricane approaced the area of the buoy, wave periods and wave heights increased. As the hurricane headed further out to sea, wave periods and wave heights fell AND SO ON...

Photographer: (Put your paragraph(s) here) Surf cams at more than 100 beaches were surveyed to determine the locations where the highest waves were occuring worldwide. With the appearance of Hurricane Lane, it was predicted that the best waves would occur up and down the coast of California. Surf cam pictures from Huntington Beach and Trestles on September 12 (surfcamhb.jpg and surfcamtrestles.jpg) illustrate the types of waves generated from Hurricane Lane. Air and water temperatures were similar at about 70 degrees. The highest surf (double overhead) was reported at the Wedge (picture not shown). While models predicted high waves as far north as Santa Barbara, the storm waves appeared limited to Orange County south to San Diego. AND SO ON...

Surfer: (Put your paragraph(s) here) Wave model forecasts for the week of September 10-17 indicated strong activity in the Pacific Ocean between 20-30 degrees North latitude and 135-140 degrees West longitude. (see wforecast910.jpg and wforecast912.jpg) Models predicted waves in excess of 12 feet in a narrow band approximately 1000 miles south-southeast of Hawaii. Other significant waves were predicted for the South Pacific and the South Atlantic, as large Antarctic storms were generated in these regions. Near the southern California coast, wave models overpredicted wave heights at all locations. As well, wave activity was confined to a narrower region that that which was predicted by the model. AND SO ON...